NBAA BACE 2021 Recap

It was great getting to see everyone in person again at BACE 2021 for the first time since 2019. It’s been a long road, but it was a great show with lots of useful information. Here are a few topics that came up during the week that we think you will find uniquely interesting. 

International and Regulatory Updates 

LOA Streamline Process 

The FAA, OEMs, and industry stakeholders have been working together over the past year to simplify the LOA application process. Through this process an operator would receive three statements of compliance (SOCs): ASOC from the aircraft manufacturer, TSOC from their training provider, and PSOC from their procedures provider. The three statements of compliance along with a simple form constitute the application and could be used to apply for 10 different LOAs. Once submitted to the FSDO the inspector would not need to review any further documentation which should bring approval times down from months to days. 

The program is expected to incorporate the following LOAs: 

  • A056 
  • B036 
  • B039 
  • B046 
  • B054 
  • C048 
  • C052 
  • C063 
  • C073 
  • D095 

The FAA is currently working on draft guidance and is hoping to have something official in the first half of next year. They plan on initially rolling out the program to Part 91 operators who are applying for LOAs for brand new aircraft with approved ASOCs. 

North Atlantic Errors 

Errors related to large height deviations, lateral deviations, and coordination events were specifically mentioned during one of the sessions. As operators start making NAT crossings after such a long hiatus, it’s important to review your procedures again and familiarize yourself with requirements and best practices. This self-study should include your operations procedures manual and ICAO’s Oceanic Errors Safety Bulletin. Crews may want to also consider recurrent international procedures training prior their next oceanic crossing. 

Also, remember that best practices are often just as important as the required procedures. Though things like recording navigation readings or doing navigation sensor checks may not always be strictly required, they are still a good practice that can help prevent deviations. 

If you run into an issue that would be classified as an oceanic error, then be sure to consult your operations manual for error reporting procedures and, if necessary, incident reporting procedures. Additionally, you will want to submit a report to your SMS to record the issue and allow for appropriate mitigations to be put into place. 

Discontinuance of Oceanic Clearances 

In 2019 ICAO held a workshop with their NAT planning group to discuss priorities for upcoming mandates and airspace redesign. They set a 2030 Vision “To achieve an interoperable global air traffic management system, for all users during all phases of flight, that meets agreed levels of safety, provides for optimum economic operations, is environmentally sustainable and meets national security requirements.” 

Additionally, they set 2030 Vision Principles, seven sets of goals and objectives, and listed numerous potential improvement considerations. One of the items for improvement considerations was the discontinuance of oceanic clearances. ICAO is just starting work on this initiative and is expected to continue development through 2023. 

Although not specifically mentioned at BACE, additional improvement considerations of interest include: 

  •  SATVOICE permissibility and requirements for migration from HF to SATVOICE as a backup to FANS communication. 
  • RVSM expansion to include airspace above FL410. 
  • ADS-B ITP expansion. 
  • Expanding PBCS / PBN requirements. 

As far as we know, specifics on these topics are not yet available, but we are keeping an eye out for updates. 

MEL Updates 

Current Approval Process 

If you are currently waiting for approval of an MEL you are not alone. With the increase in operators requesting MELs and the complex nature of the manuals, reports at BACE were that on average D195 LOA approvals were between 4 days to 16 months. From our own experience we have seen most falling between 2-3 months, but with a notable amount in excess of 4 months. With increasing international pressure to operate with a customized MEL, it’s advised that operators submit for their MELs well in advance of any upcoming trips. 

Guidance Change Reminders 

The MEL guidance session picked out a few key regulatory reminders, including: 

  • AC 91-67
    This AC originally provided guidance on acceptable methods of operation with inoperative equipment. This was canceled on November 3, 2017 as the AC was no longer in compliance with ICAO standards. An updated version of this has been drafted and is pending final release. 
  • Policy Letter PL-25
    This PL was recently revised to Revision 22 and includes significant changes that clarify definitions and remove information about usage in an MEL from the definition itself. Operators using the MMEL as an MEL should download the most recent version and keep it onboard with their other required MMEL documents. Those with approved MELs can update the Policy Letter during their next MEL update. 

Upcoming Guidance Changes 

  • AC 91-67A. After the original version of this AC was canceled, AC 91-67A was drafted to bring the guidance in line with current ICAO standards. Although the final version of this AC has not been released yet, the most notable item in the AC is the discontinuance of LOA D095, use of an MMEL as an MEL, for Part 91 operators. It’s estimated that there are around 11,000 of these LOAs currently in use that would need to be migrated to a customized D195 MEL. Operators currently using the MMEL as an MEL are strongly encouraged to begin the development and submission process of a customized MEL as soon as possible. 

SMS Challenges 

As expected, SMS continued to be a hot topic at BACE. As many departments are recognizing the importance of SMS and starting to incorporate programs, there is much to write about. Here we will just mention some of the key questions that came up during the event but stay tuned for future posts with in-depth discussions about the issues and how to solve them. 

  • How to get everyone involved.
    SMS is most effective and easiest to execute when the entire organization is participating in the process. Getting everyone involved including pilots, HR, admin, maintenance, schedulers/dispatchers, accountants, etc. is challenging. Including all departments during the development and implementation of your SMS will help ease buy-in. 
  • How to maintain your SMS as personnel and roles change.
    Two major challenges operators are facing right now are turnover and shifting of roles within their organization. Ensuring the responsibility for your SMS is appropriately handed off to the next person while still continuing to participate in the program is difficult if succession and depth planning have not been established. Documenting your SMS procedures is a first step to making it easier for someone new to pick up and continue the program management. 
  • How change impacts your operation.
    The steps you need to take to manage change and the impact it can have on safety is a topic not discussed enough. Operators need a set process in place to identify the risks a change may have and determine ways to mitigate those risks so they have a clear path for managing and evaluating changes small and large. 
  • What does SMS look like for the single pilot, single aircraft operator?
    From small to large, SMS is necessary for every operator; however, the program should be tailored to fit the characteristics of a particular operator. While a single pilot, single aircraft operation doesn’t need complex approval flows, they will still need a process for recording safety and risk data, implementing mitigations, and analyzing effectiveness of mitigations. 

We hope that those who were able to attend BACE had a great time and that those who were not able to be there in person find our recap helpful in getting a taste of what was discussed. Of course, if you have any questions on these topics or other items you heard at BACE, feel free to reach out. 

AviationManuals Releases Revamped Emergency Response Form

The updated form will better assist Emergency Operators in gathering the necessary information both quickly and seamlessly to prevent confusion when the seconds count most

AviationManuals, the leading provider of manual development services and Safety Management System (SMS) software, has released an updated version of their Emergency Response Form. The form’s new structure allows for a more seamless collection of information in the event of an accident, injury, or threat.

The Emergency Response Form’s updated configuration follows the order that emergency information is received. The failure to gather the correct and vital information could have damaging and long-term consequences. This reliable and easy-to-follow guide ensures all necessary details are correctly recorded and accounted for. This significant update also now includes emergencies for business aviation operators, FBOs, and drone operators.

“In the aviation industry your response to an emergency matters,” said Mark Baier, CEO of AviationManuals. “The updates we have made better encompass emergencies that can occur both on the ground, and in the air. At AviationManuals we are committed to the continued update and improvement of our services. Our mantra is ‘safety is in the small stuff.’ Following some internal research, we found that the form needed a revised structure. It was updated accordingly for optimal use during an emergency situation.”

About AviationManuals 

Products and services include SMS Software, FBO Manuals, Flight/Company Operations Manuals, International Operations and Procedures Manuals, Minimum Equipment Lists, Emergency Response Plans, and Internal Audit Programs, as well as Letters of Authorization (LOA) support for RVSM, Data Link (CPDLC / ADS-C), PBN (RNP-10 / -4, NAT HLA, B-/P-RNAV, and RNP-1), Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS), Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), and EFBs.

AviationManuals is a member of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), International Business Aviation Council (IBAC), and the National Air Transportation Association (NATA). For more information on AviationManuals, go to www.aviationmanuals.com.

AviationManuals’ sister company ARC Safety Management is a modular online and app solution for managing safety, communications and overall aviation operations. The company offers customizable web and mobile Safety Management Systems for aircraft operations, FBOs, and commercial drone operators to submit, store and analyze SMS data. For more info go to www.arcsky.com.

AviationManuals Plays Integral Role in Development of an Updated Streamlined FAA Approval Process

AviationManuals’ procedural insights helped reduce letter of authorization process wait times from months to days

AviationManuals is the leading provider of manual development services and Safety Management System (SMS) software. Today the company announced that for the past year it has been working closely with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) as a key stakeholder in the development of a new, streamlined, letter of authorization process (LOA) for Part 91 operators. That process is expected to be available early next year to all Part 91 operators leveraging FAA approved vendors like AviationManuals to apply for LOAs with the FAA and have those applications reviewed (and approved) on a streamlined basis.

“We have been collaborating with industry leaders the past several months to develop a more optimized process for obtaining LOAs,” said Clement Meersseman, Senior Advisor – International Procedures, AviationManuals. “With our company’s deep knowledge and expertise in aviation safety, AviationManuals played an integral role in the direction of this project, and created the new standards and procedures for obtaining this essential document for operators.”

AviationManuals is the first aviation safety provider approved by the FAA provide this service. This event marks yet another long and distinguished step forward in the company’s history of promoting safety in the skies.

Up until now, the previous LOA process was cumbersome with disjointed approval procedures and wait times of several months. Utilizing AviationManuals’ proficiency in aviation safety practices, the company helped to create the new system that enables operators to continuously obtain the required authorizations from specific vendors.

It is a revolutionary approach that will ensure a more streamlined final LOA approval process. This saves both the FAA and operators considerable time and money in maintaining their authority to operate.

Currently in the testing phase, this new process (available for new aircraft only) reduces the LOA approval time from weeks or months to days.

“We are extremely proud to have played such an important role in developing this new streamlined process,” said Mark Baier, CEO of AviationManuals. “The fact that we were the very first safety provider approved to participate by the FAA is a strong testament to what we do as a company. We look forward to the official roll out later this year.”

About AviationManuals 

Products and services include SMS Software, FBO Manuals, Flight/Company Operations Manuals, International Operations and Procedures Manuals, Minimum Equipment Lists, Emergency Response Plans, and Internal Audit Programs, as well as Letters of Authorization (LOA) support for RVSM, Data Link (CPDLC / ADS-C), PBN (RNP-10 / -4, NAT HLA, B-/P-RNAV, and RNP-1), Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS), Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), and EFBs.

AviationManuals is a member of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), International Business Aviation Council (IBAC), and the National Air Transportation Association (NATA). For more information on AviationManuals, go to www.aviationmanuals.com.

AviationManuals’ sister company ARC Safety Management is a modular online and app solution for managing safety, communications and overall aviation operations. The company offers customizable web and mobile Safety Management Systems for aircraft operations, FBOs, and commercial drone operators to submit, store and analyze SMS data. For more info go to www.arcsky.com.

International Operations Proves to be a Key Topic of NBAA Webinar

NBAA Webinar Attended by over 900 Aviation Professionals as AviationManuals assembles robust panel to answer post-covid international operations’ questions.

On June 23rd, AviationManuals, the leading provider of manual development services and Safety Management System (SMS) software, hosted an exceptionally well attended webinar as part of the NBAA News Hour entitled “Flying Internationally in the New Norm Is Anything But Routine – Are you Prepared?

Coinciding with the NBAA’s Safety Month, the webinar featured information on what flight departments and pilots need to know about flying internationally today, as well as upcoming changes. The panel discussion included members of the FAA, Gulfstream, Scott IPC, and AviationManuals, and Q&A continued well beyond the end of the webinar.

“Operators really do need to be proactive in today’s operating environment,” said Kevin Honan, Senior Advisor of Operations Manuals. “As the world continues to reopen, this webinar hopefully addressed some of the lingering unknowns by providing up-to-date information for pilots, flight departments, and individuals responsible for safe operations.”

“The webinar was a great opportunity to get various industry partners together to provide operators with valuable insights on current and upcoming matters and requirements.” added Clément Meersseman, Senior Advisor, International Procedures. “By having different stakeholders together in one forum it provided an opportunity to cover essential topics during one value packed hour.”

A recording of the webinar is now available. For access, please visit https://bit.ly/36cv7Ro.

For more information on AviationManuals, please also visit www.aviationmanuals.com.

About AviationManuals 

Products and services include SMS Software, FBO Manuals, Flight/Company Operations Manuals, International Operations and Procedures Manuals, Minimum Equipment Lists, Emergency Response Plans, and Internal Audit Programs, as well as Letters of Authorization (LOA) support for RVSM, Data Link (CPDLC / ADS-C), PBN (RNP-10 / -4, NAT HLA, B-/P-RNAV, and RNP-1), Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS), Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), and EFBs.

AviationManuals is a member of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), International Business Aviation Council (IBAC), and the National Air Transportation Association (NATA). For more information on AviationManuals, go to www.aviationmanuals.com.

AviationManuals’ sister company ARC Safety Management is a modular online and app solution for managing safety, communications and overall aviation operations. The company offers customizable web and mobile Safety Management Systems for aircraft operations, FBOs, and commercial drone operators to submit, store and analyze SMS data. For more info go to www.arcsky.com.

AviationManuals Launches Innovative Membership Service Integrating Manuals and SMS for Enhanced Aviation Safety

The new one-of-a-kind offering combines the company’s renowned content with its Safety Management System software creating a single platform for manuals, updates, and SMS.

AviationManuals, the leading provider of manual development services and Safety Management System (SMS) software, announces the launch of an entirely new and unique membership experience www.aviationmanuals.com.

The exciting new offering pairs AviationManuals’ valuable operations manual development and update services with an online tool that includes document hosting, verification, distribution, industry news, and ready access to safety metrics data.

The combination of ARC, AviationManuals’ SMS Software, with its coveted manuals provides a more wholistic approach to managing operational improvement and safety.

Moving forward, all manuals and LOA services will be paired with software, enabling the company to provide regular content updates as well as valuable industry and regulatory information, helping its 4,000-strong and growing customer base continually become better and safer. The goal is to create a central platform for business aviation operators and FBOs to manage the resources they need to operate safely.

The new package includes:

  • A single online location to manage all manuals, updates and distribution
  • Unlimited storage and file formats
  • Read and Initial Tracking
  • News, resources, updates, and member only content and expert topics
  • Real time safety metrics

Operators can save time and money by replacing paid document hosting and management tools with this all-in-one content and software solution. Operators can read and initial documents, automate notifications, develop customized file structures, get news and updates, and easily see the latest global safety metrics.

The company believes this improved approach helps bring together all the tools and information that aircraft operators and FBOs need to operate better and safer. “This isn’t just a tweak – but a fundamental change in how we will be delivering our content, our expertise, and software access to our customers moving forward.” said Mark Baier, CEO of AviationManuals.

“We now offer the most holistic continual improvement and safety system available anywhere on the market.” says Baier. “I’m truly excited about this, because SMS combined with continual operational improvement is the future of our industry, so the more we can help to get users to participate the better. As a company, we care about making it easy for every aviation operator to be better and safer. This really is a one-of-a-kind offering.”

About AviationManuals 

Products and services include SMS Software, FBO Manuals, Flight/Company Operations Manuals, International Operations and Procedures Manuals, Minimum Equipment Lists, Emergency Response Plans, and Internal Audit Programs, as well as Letters of Authorization (LOA) support for RVSM, Data Link (CPDLC / ADS-C), PBN (RNP-10 / -4, NAT HLA, B-/P-RNAV, and RNP-1), Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS), Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), and EFBs.

AviationManuals is a member of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), International Business Aviation Council (IBAC), and the National Air Transportation Association (NATA). For more information on AviationManuals, go to www.aviationmanuals.com.

AviationManuals’ sister company ARC Safety Management is a modular online and app solution for managing safety, communications and overall aviation operations. The company offers customizable web and mobile Safety Management Systems for aircraft operations, FBOs, and commercial drone operators to submit, store and analyze SMS data. For more info go to www.arcsky.com.

AviationManuals hosting webinar with the NBAA during Safety Month

AviationManuals to Host Key Webinar Focused on Flying Safely Internationally

AviationManuals, the leading provider of manual development services and Safety Management System (SMS) software, will be hosting a webinar as part of the NBAA News Hour on June 23rd at 11:00am EST, entitled “Flying Internationally in the New Norm Is Anything But Routine – Are you Prepared?”

REGISTER HERE

Coinciding with the NBAA’s Safety Month, the webinar will feature information on what flight departments and pilots need to know about flying internationally today. The seminar will include a presentation, Q&A session, and a robust panel discussion by members of the FAA, Gulfstream, and AviationManuals. The panel will be moderated by Clement Meersseman, Senior Advisor, International Procedures of AviationManuals, and Kevin Honan, Senior Advisor of AviationManuals. The panel members confirmed to attend includes:

John Attebury
Safety Standards / General Aviation and Commercial Division / Commercial Operations Branch (AFS-820)
Federal Aviation Administration

Kevin C. Kelley
Flight Operations Group / Flight Technologies and Procedures Division (AFS-400) / FAA Flight Standards
Federal Aviation Administration

Justin Maas
Gulfstream Flight Test
Gulfstream Aerospace

Scott McLellan
Operations Aviation Safety Inspector / Flight Technologies and Procedures Division (AFS-400) / EFVS Policy
Federal Aviation Administration

Shawn Scott
Founder
Scott IPC

As international travel begins to return to normal, flight departments will need to restart flying once again. “The world is reopening,” said Mark Baier, CEO of AviationManuals. “This is the ideal time to discuss how you fly safely when traveling internationally.”

Key take-aways from the session will include:

  • The operational guidelines that apply to international travel (such as procedures manuals, SMS needs, contingency procedures, inspections, and other operational aspects)
  • Flight authorizations needed and the requirements for airworthiness and operations
  • Aircraft equipment needs for safe international operations

This information-packed session is expected to be highly attended by pilots, flight departments, and individuals responsible for safety operations. For more information and to register please visit Webinar: Flying Internationally in the New Norm is Anything But Routine – Are You Prepared? by NBAA (bigmarker.com). Note: you do not have to be a NBAA member to attend.

About AviationManuals 

Products and services include SMS Software, FBO Manuals, Flight/Company Operations Manuals, International Operations and Procedures Manuals, Minimum Equipment Lists, Emergency Response Plans, and Internal Audit Programs, as well as Letters of Authorization (LOA) support for RVSM, Data Link (CPDLC / ADS-C), PBN (RNP-10 / -4, NAT HLA, B-/P-RNAV, and RNP-1), Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS), Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), and EFBs.

AviationManuals is a member of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), International Business Aviation Council (IBAC), and the National Air Transportation Association (NATA). For more information on AviationManuals, go to www.aviationmanuals.com.

AviationManuals’ sister company ARC Safety Management is a modular online and app solution for managing safety, communications and overall aviation operations. The company offers customizable web and mobile Safety Management Systems for aircraft operations, FBOs, and commercial drone operators to submit, store and analyze SMS data. For more info go to www.arcsky.com.

 

AviationManuals Grows Following Record First Quarter Results

AviationManuals Grows Staff by 20% Following Record First Quarter Results and a Record Month in March

AviationManuals, the leading provider of manual development services and Safety Management System (SMS) software, recently announced an exceptionally strong start to 2021 resulting in 20% team growth.

“We have enjoyed a record start to 2021 growing sales 30% over 2020’s first quarter, which is wonderful considering the pandemic is still lingering,” said Mark Baier, CEO. “Safer more professional operations continue to be the focus of operators seeking our services, and our unique combination of operations manuals and SMS software continues to be well received.”

As the company continues to enjoy rapid growth, AviationManuals expanded its team by 20% in just two months; onboarding new team members in the areas of Sales, IT Support, and Operations Manuals Advisors.

AviationManuals is continuing its hiring trend as it currently seeks customer experience representatives and software development technicians. Qualified and enthusiastic safety aviation professionals are encouraged to apply as the company continues to grow into 2021 and beyond.

“Our hiring will bolster AviationManuals’ ability to support our customers’ desire to continually improve safety while also ensuring the customer experience remains front and center as we grow,” said Baier. “The global pandemic has been a unique time for all businesses. I am extremely proud of our team for continuing to do all we can to help improve aviation safety and thrilled that more and more operators seek to become better at what they do.”

About AviationManuals 

Products and services include SMS Software, FBO Manuals, Flight/Company Operations Manuals, International Operations and Procedures Manuals, Minimum Equipment Lists, Emergency Response Plans, and Internal Audit Programs, as well as Letters of Authorization (LOA) support for RVSM, Data Link (CPDLC / ADS-C), PBN (RNP-10 / -4, NAT HLA, B-/P-RNAV, and RNP-1), Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS), Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), and EFBs.

AviationManuals is a member of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), International Business Aviation Council (IBAC), and the National Air Transportation Association (NATA). For more information on AviationManuals, go to www.aviationmanuals.com.

AviationManuals’ sister company ARC Safety Management is a modular online and app solution for managing safety, communications and overall aviation operations. The company offers customizable web and mobile Safety Management Systems for aircraft operations, FBOs, and commercial drone operators to submit, store and analyze SMS data. For more info go to www.arcsky.com.

 

You Don’t Need an LOA for RNAV… Unless You Do!

Part 91 operators aren’t required to obtain a Letter of Authorization (LOA) for RNAV or GPS-based ILS procedures (also called RNP APCH). So why does the FAA offer such an LOA – what’s the point? AviationManuals explains.

In the US, RNAV procedures are commonplace. That’s because the FAA’s Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) – a Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) that augments GPS to improve its accuracy, integrity and availability – has been helping pilots land at small and regional airports around the country for years. Because of this history, Part 91 operators do not need a Letter of Authorization (LOA) to use RNP APCH procedures within the US.

Outside the US, however, it’s a different story.

As SBAS is so effective at opening up small and regional airports to general and business aviation traffic, many other regions are now building their own SBAS systems. For example, Europe’s EGNOS system is already fully operational and capable of augmenting both GPS and Galileo signals.

First the good news…

For international operators, the good news is your WAAS-capable avionics is most likely fully compatible with many of these other systems, so you can already take advantage of these new satellite-based procedures.

The not so good news, however, is that in order to do so, you first have to show that you are authorized to fly RNAV procedures.

This is because unlike in the US, in Europe, for example, these procedures are a relatively new concept that require not only that an aircraft have the corresponding airworthiness approval, but also that the pilots have the appropriate training, checking standards and operational procedures in place.

You can’t go wrong with an LOA

Although in Europe, EASA is working to amend some of these regulations, as a general rule, all operators are required to follow the necessary operational procedures. CAT operators must therefore amend their operational manual accordingly as part of their air operator approval. But don’t worry, there’s no additional training required. All you need to do is to get an LOA C052 from the FAA, which shows that your aircraft is capable of SBAS-augmented approaches.

If you frequently conduct international operations, it’s probably a good idea to add this authorization to your LOAs. On the one hand, this covers you in any country that does require specific authorization for RNAV procedures, such as Hong Kong. On the other hand, even where such authorization isn’t required, a country, such as the UK, may require you to have a valid state authorization in order to use MDA as a DA/DH with the approach. The MDA as DA/DH authorization is given under LOA C073, and a prerequisite for this is – you guessed it – the C052.

AviationManuals is able to assist you in obtaining both a C052 and C073 authorization. The overall process is simple and affordable and dovetails easily with your existing International Operations Manual. Contact us today for a quote.

5 things you should know about ADS-B authorization

One topic that causes constant confusion for international business jet operators is ADS-B Out: what it is, why you need it and when it’s required. To help clear the air, here are five things you need to know about ADS-B Out.

1.  ADS-B = Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast

Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast, or ADS-B, is a satellite-based aircraft monitoring system set to replace today’s radar-based system. The system uses the aircraft’s GPS to determine positioning information, and then sends this information to ATC. Whereas radar is only able to update an aircraft’s position once every 3 to 12 seconds, with ADS-B ATC this happens every second. This transmission of data from the avionics to ATC is called ADS-B Out.

2. Authorization is required in east Asia

Although not currently required for operations over the US, many other countries do require ADS-B approvals from an operators’ civil aviation authority. As this list regularly changes, it is highly recommended to always check with your safety management professional before leaving on any international trip

3. The US will require ADS-B starting in 2020

In 2010, the FAA published new rules that require operators to have ADS-B Out avionics by January 1st, 2020. This regulation applies to:

  • Class A, B and C airspace
  • All airspace at and above 10,000 feet MSL over the 48 contiguous United States and the District of Columbia
  • Within 30 nautical miles of airports listed in 14 CFR sec. 91.225, from the surface up to 10,000 feet MSL
  • Class E airspace over the Gulf of Mexico from the US coastline out to 12 nautical miles, at and above 3,000 feet MSL

4. The LOA – what it is and when you need it

As most new aircraft come ADS-B equipped, you only have to provide the destination country’s air navigation service provider (ANSP) with documentation that shows this. However, the type of documentation can vary from country to country. The most common format is the Letter of Authorization (LOA), which you get from your civil aviation authority. Currently, China, Hong Kong, India, Singapore and Vietnam require an LOA.

According to the FAA, an LOA is required whenever one uses ADS-B outside the US unless otherwise noted. Based on this rather ambiguous regulation, the default assumption is, when operating outside the US, an LOA is required. You can obtain an LOA from the FAA. These were originally issued as an A353 authorization. However, in an effort to streamline the process, the FAA has replaced the A353 with the OpSpec/MSpec/LOA A153.

5. I already have an A353, do i now need an A153?

Rest assured, your current A353 LOA is still valid. If aircraft are added or removed from your LOA, the FAA will reissue your existing authorization as an A153. You may also send the FAA a request to reissue your A353 as an A153. No additional documentation is required to do this.

We Can Help – Contact Us

You can develop ADS-B procedures either as a supplement to your RVSM/International Operations Manual or as a standalone ADS-B document. This, along with supporting documentation, is then simply submitted to your Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) or International Field Office (IFO).

AviationManuals makes applying for ADS-B approvals easy. Just complete a simple questionnaire and one of our experts will quickly assemble an appropriate and thorough application for you. Our support continues until the application package is approved, and our full-time staff are happy to help you gather any additional information that your FSDO or IFO may require.